ISEMPH 2021 – online meeting

I’m on the programme for the excellent International Society for Evolutionary Medicine and Public Health‘s annual meeting again this year. As usual, I expect the conference will be superb. However, things will be a little different this year, as the whole event will be virtual: https://isemph.org/ISEMPH-2021

Although I understand that many people are suffering from “Zoom fatigue”, an online conference offers a number of fresh advantages. It becomes easier for people from all over the world to participate without time, cost, or carbon footprint concerns becoming barriers. We can be innovative about our scheduling too. Having some pre-recorded talks and posters available in advance of the conference will mean more time to interact with each other on the day. More interaction can mean more ideas, more fun, and more potential for collaboration. Another advantage of having some pre-recorded talks: you can pause, rewind, and watch again! No more wondering if you’re asking a silly question because you didn’t quite hear something that was said earlier on in the talk. Equally, if the topic of the talk isn’t quite as you expected, you can stop watching without fear of disrupting others in the audience. This year’s meeting will enjoy all these advantages, plus some of the buzz of a live event with some live talks and Q&A sessions.

To really boost the interactivity of the conference, we’ll also be running our first ever Evolutionary Medicine and Public Health Grand Challenges! Conference delegates can sign up to work in virtual teams to address the big questions and challenges facing medicine and public health today, with topics ranging from ageing to tuberculosis. The aim of these events is to encourage new connections and collaborations, and to spark innovation in the EMPH community. Check out the ISEMPH-2021 website for further details: https://isemph.org/Grand-Challenges-2021

Delegates at the Inaugural ISEMPH meeting in 2015, in Tempe, Arizona.
Delegates at the Inaugural ISEMPH meeting in 2015, in Tempe, Arizona

Video: Being there (talk at the ESRC Festival)

Being there: a brief visit to a neighbourhood induces the social attitudes of that neighbourhood

Here is a video of one my recent talks as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science event, “Using social sciences to tackle the toxicity of urban life”. The video just gives footage of me talking, so you will need to download the slides as a PDF here: beingtherepresentationslides.pdf.

The publication associated with this presentation can be found at: https://peerj.com/articles/236/

A delayed post about Prosocial Place

I recently gave a talk about my work as part of an Economic and Social Research council festival of Social Science event in Liverpool. The event was titled, “Using social sciences to tackle the toxicity of urban life” and the speakers came from a range of disciplines, from Evolutionary Anthropology to Sociology. The common goal? To understand the impacts of urban environments on physical and mental health.

Several of the speakers were part of the Prosocial Place initiative, which brings together researchers who have an interest in improving urban life. Prosocial Place is still young, but given the obvious implications of their work for city dwellers around the world, it might be one to watch.

You can follow the Prosocial Place blog here: http://prosocialplace.blogspot.co.uk/