Measuring perceived uncontrollable mortality risk

I’m beginning to build a bank of resources to support people to use the measures of perceived control over mortality risk that Daniel Nettle and I developed some years ago (Pepper & Nettle, 2014). So far, these measures seem to be a good predictor of health behaviour and, in our data, they outperform the Multidemsional Health Locus of Control (MHLC), which is a commonly used measure examining a similar construct.

To get things started, I’ve created my first ever #BetterPoster (see here for more on the “Better Poster” concept) that gives a brief overview of the theory and evidence regarding the relationship between perceived uncontrollable mortality risk and health behaviour. I’m presenting this poster at EHBEA2021, and Richard Brown will be giving a talk on some of the evidence summarised in panel 4 of the poster below. The 2-minute audio recording that accompanies the poster can be downloaded here.

I’ve also created a 1-page guide to using the measure, which gives the question text and an at-a-glance summary of what the responses represent, with references for further details. You can download the guide here.

My #BetterPoster for EHBEA 2021 – a summary of the evidence so far on perceived uncontrollable mortality risk & health behaviour.

The poster above is embedded as an image, so the links don’t work. Here are the links to the key references:

Nettle (2010),

Pepper & Nettle (2014a),

Pepper & Nettle (2014b),

Brown, Coventry & Pepper (2020 – preprint).

New maps: Cross-country relationships between life expectancy, intertemporal choice and age at first birth

In one of my previous posts, I presented some interactive maps, made using Google Fusion Tables, to support a paper on Cross-country relationships between life expectancy, intertemporal choice and age at first birth, written with my collaborator, Adam Bulley. However, Google have since … Continue reading

New book out now!

Applied Evolutionary Anthropology: Darwinian Approaches to Contemporary World Issues

AEA Book Cover

This book has been published as the first of a series, Advances in the Evolutionary Analysis of Human Behaviour, edited by Rebecca Sear. The series is intended “to promote the European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association tenets of rigour, integration and pluralism by producing a series of methodologically rigorous books with a pluralistic theme in the human behavioral sciences.”

This volume was edited by Mhairi Gibson and David Lawson. I am proud to have made my contribution, along with with Daniel Nettle:

Chapter 10Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviour: An Evolutionary Perspective.